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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 3165396, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3165396
Review Article

Impact of Aging and Exercise on Mitochondrial Quality Control in Skeletal Muscle

1Muscle Health Research Centre, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3
2School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3

Correspondence should be addressed to David A. Hood; ac.ukroy@doohd

Received 31 March 2017; Accepted 3 May 2017; Published 1 June 2017

Academic Editor: Moh H. Malek

Copyright © 2017 Yuho Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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