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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 3831972, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3831972
Review Article

Exercise Modifies the Gut Microbiota with Positive Health Effects

1Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetic and Sport Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy
2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy
3Department of Medicine, Surgery, and Dentistry “Scuola Medica Salernitana”, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Giovanni Messina; ti.2aninu@anissem.innaig

Received 5 August 2016; Revised 18 December 2016; Accepted 5 January 2017; Published 5 March 2017

Academic Editor: Ryuichi Morishita

Copyright © 2017 Vincenzo Monda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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