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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4130967, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4130967
Research Article

Seabuckthorn Paste Protects Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice through Attenuation of Oxidative Stress

1College of Ethnomedicine, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China
2College of Pharmacy, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China
3Sichuan Academy of Chinese Medicine Sciences, Chengdu, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Li Wan; moc.361@1088ilnaw

Received 15 May 2017; Accepted 9 July 2017; Published 16 August 2017

Academic Editor: Lin-sen Qing

Copyright © 2017 Leilei Du et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Oxidative stress is one of the major mechanisms implicated in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. Seabuckthorn paste (SP), a traditional Tibetan medicine with high content of polyphenols and remarkable antioxidant activity, is commonly used in treating pulmonary diseases. In the present study, the protective effects and possible underlying mechanisms of SP on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury in mice were investigated. It was found that body weight loss, lung tissue microstructure lesions, transvascular leakage increase, malondialdehyde augmentation, and the reduction of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels caused by LPS challenge were all consistently relieved by SP treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, accumulation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in lung nuclei caused by SP treatment was observed. Our study demonstrated that SP can provide significant protection against LPS-induced acute lung injury through maintaining redox homeostasis, and its mechanism involves Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activation.