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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 4162465, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4162465
Research Article

Neuronal Damage Induced by Perinatal Asphyxia Is Attenuated by Postinjury Glutaredoxin-2 Administration

1Instituto de Investigaciones Cardiológicas “Prof. Dr. Alberto C. Taquini” (ININCA), Facultad de Medicina, UBA-CONICET, Marcelo T. de Alvear 2270, C1122AAJ, Ciudad de Buenos Aires, Argentina
2Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Germany
3Institute for Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Universitätsmedizin Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17475 Greifswald, Germany
4Laboratory of Ocular Investigation, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
5Departament de Pedagogia i Psicologia, Facultat d′’Educació, Psicologia i Treball Social, Universitat de Lleida, Avda. de l'Estudi General 4, 25001 Lleida, Spain
6Fundación Instituto Leloir, Av. Patricias Argentinas 435, C1405BWE, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina
7Unidad de Gestión Clínica de Salud Mental, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga, Hospital Regional Universitario de Málaga, Universidad de Málaga, Avda. Carlos Haya 82, 29010 Málaga, Spain
8Departamento de Biología, Universidad Argentina JF Kennedy, Buenos Aires, Argentina
9Investigador Asociado, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Santiago, Chile

Correspondence should be addressed to Juan Ignacio Romero; moc.liamg@36oremornauj and Fernando Rodríguez de Fonseca; ue.amibi@zeugirdor.odnanref

Received 2 March 2017; Accepted 23 April 2017; Published 15 June 2017

Academic Editor: Reiko Matsui

Copyright © 2017 Juan Ignacio Romero et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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