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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 4314025, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4314025
Review Article

Evidence of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism: Biochemical Links, Genetic-Based Associations, and Non-Energy-Related Mechanisms

Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Richard J. Levy; ude.aibmuloc.cmuc@0472lr

Received 24 March 2017; Accepted 30 April 2017; Published 29 May 2017

Academic Editor: Moh H. Malek

Copyright © 2017 Keren K. Griffiths and Richard J. Levy. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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