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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4383652, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4383652
Research Article

Activation of the Nrf2-Keap 1 Pathway in Short-Term Iodide Excess in Thyroid in Rats

1Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China
2Key Laboratory of Hormones and Development (Ministry of Health), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Metabolic Diseases, Tianjin Metabolic Diseases Hospital & Tianjin Institute of Endocrinology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xiaomei Yao; moc.361@xpuj

Received 29 August 2016; Revised 29 October 2016; Accepted 23 November 2016; Published 4 January 2017

Academic Editor: Ayman M. Mahmoud

Copyright © 2017 Tingting Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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