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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5049532, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5049532
Review Article

Omega Class Glutathione S-Transferase: Antioxidant Enzyme in Pathogenesis of Neurodegenerative Diseases

1Soonchunhyang Institute of Medi-bio Science, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan 31151, Republic of Korea
2Department of Medical Biotechnology, Soonchunhyang University, Asan 31538, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Kiyoung Kim; rk.ca.hcs@2gnuoyik

Received 6 September 2017; Accepted 26 November 2017; Published 24 December 2017

Academic Editor: Sebastien Talbot

Copyright © 2017 Youngjo Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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