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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 5716409, 19 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5716409
Review Article

Protein Posttranslational Modifications: Roles in Aging and Age-Related Disease

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U1001, Université Paris Descartes and Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France

Correspondence should be addressed to Ana L. Santos; rf.mresni@sotnas.ana

Received 3 April 2017; Accepted 28 May 2017; Published 15 August 2017

Academic Editor: Izabela Sadowska-Bartosz

Copyright © 2017 Ana L. Santos and Ariel B. Lindner. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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