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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6473506, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6473506
Research Article

Ginsenoside Rg1 Ameliorates Behavioral Abnormalities and Modulates the Hippocampal Proteomic Change in Triple Transgenic Mice of Alzheimer’s Disease

1Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055, China
2Department of Obstetrics, Shenzhen People’s Hospital, The Second Clinical Medical College of Jinan University, Shenzhen 518020, China
3Department of Histology and Embryology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China
4Institute of New Drug Research and Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Innovative Chemical Drug Research in Cardio-cerebrovascular Diseases, Jinan University College of Pharmacy, Guangzhou 510632, China
5Department of Pathophysiology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430070, China
6School of Pharmacy, Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518055, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xifei Yang; moc.liamg@gnayiefix

Received 15 May 2017; Revised 7 August 2017; Accepted 24 August 2017; Published 24 October 2017

Academic Editor: Juan M. Zolezzi

Copyright © 2017 Lulin Nie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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