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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 7205082, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7205082
Research Article

Edible Bird’s Nest Prevents Menopause-Related Memory and Cognitive Decline in Rats via Increased Hippocampal Sirtuin-1 Expression

1Department of Pathology, Chengde Medical University, Chengde, Hebei 067000, China
2Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
3Gastroenterology Department, Affiliated Hospital of Chengde Medical University, Chengde, Hebei, China
4Precision Nutrition Innovation Center, School of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Zhiping Hou; moc.361@uohgnipihz and Mustapha Umar Imam; moc.liamg@mamiytsum

Received 26 June 2017; Accepted 9 August 2017; Published 20 September 2017

Academic Editor: Anna M. Giudetti

Copyright © 2017 Zhiping Hou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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