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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7303096, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7303096
Research Article

Metformin and Its Sulfenamide Prodrugs Inhibit Human Cholinesterase Activity

1Laboratory of Bioanalysis, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Drug Analysis and Radiopharmacy, Medical University of Lodz, ul. Muszyńskiego 1, 90-151 Lodz, Poland
2Students Research Group, Laboratory of Bioanalysis, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Drug Analysis and Radiopharmacy, Medical University of Lodz, ul. Muszyńskiego 1, 90-151 Lodz, Poland
3Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Drug Analysis and Radiopharmacy, Medical University of Lodz, ul. Muszyńskiego 1, 90-151 Lodz, Poland
4School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonranta 1C, POB 1627 70211 Kuopio, Finland

Correspondence should be addressed to Magdalena Markowicz-Piasecka; lp.zdol.demu@zciwokram.aneladgam

Received 11 March 2017; Revised 5 June 2017; Accepted 14 June 2017; Published 9 July 2017

Academic Editor: Eduardo L. G. Moreira

Copyright © 2017 Magdalena Markowicz-Piasecka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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