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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 7348372, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7348372
Review Article

Uncoupling Protein 2: A Key Player and a Potential Therapeutic Target in Vascular Diseases

1Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Tor Vergata University of Rome, Rome, Italy
2IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Isernia, Italy
3Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Speranza Rubattu; ti.demoruen@aznareps.uttabur

Received 25 March 2017; Revised 19 May 2017; Accepted 10 September 2017; Published 15 October 2017

Academic Editor: Ryuichi Morishita

Copyright © 2017 Giorgia Pierelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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