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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 7371010, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7371010
Review Article

Eag1 K+ Channel: Endogenous Regulation and Functions in Nervous System

1Department of General Surgery, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200336, China
2Hongqiao International Institute of Medicine, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200336, China
3Center for Life Sciences, National Laboratory Astana and School of Sciences and Technology, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000, Kazakhstan
4Department of Anesthesiology, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200336, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Shangwei Hou; nc.ude.utjs@wsuoh

Received 14 November 2016; Revised 27 December 2016; Accepted 31 January 2017; Published 6 March 2017

Academic Editor: Rodrigo Franco

Copyright © 2017 Bo Han et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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