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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 7478523, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7478523
Review Article

Supplementation of Micronutrient Selenium in Metabolic Diseases: Its Role as an Antioxidant

School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong

Correspondence should be addressed to Yibin Feng; kh.ukh@gnefy

Received 28 June 2017; Revised 28 October 2017; Accepted 5 November 2017; Published 26 December 2017

Academic Editor: Rodrigo Valenzuela

Copyright © 2017 Ning Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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