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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 7928981, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7928981
Research Article

Impact of Yoga and Meditation on Cellular Aging in Apparently Healthy Individuals: A Prospective, Open-Label Single-Arm Exploratory Study

1Lab for Molecular Reproduction and Genetics, Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India
2Department of Psychiatry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India

Correspondence should be addressed to Rima Dada; moc.liamffider@adad_amir

Received 22 September 2016; Revised 17 December 2016; Accepted 22 December 2016; Published 16 January 2017

Academic Editor: Delminda Neves

Copyright © 2017 Madhuri Tolahunase et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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