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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8416763, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8416763
Review Article

Oxidative Stress: Harms and Benefits for Human Health

1Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
2Department of Biomedical Sciences, Dentistry and Morphological and Functional Images, University of Messina, Messina, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Gabriele Pizzino; ti.eminu@onizzipgc

Received 26 May 2017; Accepted 5 July 2017; Published 27 July 2017

Academic Editor: Victor M. Victor

Copyright © 2017 Gabriele Pizzino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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