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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 8459402, 23 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8459402
Review Article

Redox Regulation of Inflammatory Processes Is Enzymatically Controlled

1Department of Structural Biology, Institute of Zoology, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany
2Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, UK
3Leibniz-Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), ZIK plasmatis, Greifswald, Germany
4Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Eva-Maria Hanschmann; ed.frodlesseud-inu.dem@nnamhcsnah.airam-ave

Received 3 March 2017; Revised 6 July 2017; Accepted 25 July 2017; Published 8 October 2017

Academic Editor: Shane Thomas

Copyright © 2017 Inken Lorenzen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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