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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 9172741, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9172741
Research Article

4-Hydroxynonenal Contributes to Angiogenesis through a Redox-Dependent Sphingolipid Pathway: Prevention by Hydralazine Derivatives

1INSERM I2MC, UMR-1048, Toulouse, France
2Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse III, Toulouse, France
3CNRS UMR 5068, Laboratoire de Synthèse et Physico-Chimie de Molécules d’Intérêt Biologique, Toulouse, France

Correspondence should be addressed to Anne Nègre-Salvayre; rf.mresni@eryavlas-ergen.enna

Received 5 January 2017; Accepted 1 March 2017; Published 5 April 2017

Academic Editor: Liudmila Korkina

Copyright © 2017 Caroline Camaré et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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