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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 9536148, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9536148
Research Article

The Citrus Flavanone Naringenin Protects Myocardial Cells against Age-Associated Damage

1Department of Pharmacy, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
2Interdepartmental Research Center “Nutraceuticals and Food for Health”, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Eleonora Da Pozzo; ti.ipinu@ozzopad.aronoele

Received 16 November 2016; Revised 6 February 2017; Accepted 28 February 2017; Published 12 March 2017

Academic Editor: Victor M. Victor

Copyright © 2017 Eleonora Da Pozzo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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