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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 9692546, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9692546
Research Article

Activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome by Advanced Glycation End Products Promotes Pancreatic Islet Damage

1Department of Endocrinology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092, China
2Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Yijishan Hospital, Wuhu 241001, China
3Engineering Technology Research Center of Polysaccharides Drug, Wuhu, Anhui Province 241002, China
4Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology & Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Guang-Xun Meng; nc.ca.spi@gnemxg and Qing Su; moc.361@auhnixgniqus

Received 16 May 2017; Revised 5 August 2017; Accepted 29 August 2017; Published 5 November 2017

Academic Editor: Izabela Sadowska-Bartosz

Copyright © 2017 Xiang Kong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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