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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9703574, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9703574
Research Article

Mitochondrial Respiration in Intact Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Sirtuin 3 Activity in Patients with Movement Disorders

1Department of Neurochemistry and Neuropathology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Przybyszewskiego str. 49, 60-355 Poznan, Poland
2Department of Neurology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Przybyszewskiego str. 49, 60-355 Poznan, Poland
3Chair and Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Szamarzewskiego str. 82/84, 60-569 Poznan, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Slawomir Michalak

Received 31 March 2017; Accepted 1 August 2017; Published 10 September 2017

Academic Editor: Leah Siskind

Copyright © 2017 Slawomir Michalak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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