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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 3537471, 28 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3537471
Review Article

Regulation of Tumor Progression by Programmed Necrosis

1Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735, Republic of Korea
2DNA Identification Center, National Forensic Service, Seoul 158-707, Republic of Korea
3Nanobiotechnology Center, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735, Republic of Korea
4The Division of Natural Medical Sciences, College of Health Science, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Song Iy Han; rk.ca.nusohc@nahis and Ho Sung Kang; rk.ca.nasup@gnakpsh

Received 30 August 2017; Accepted 28 November 2017; Published 31 January 2018

Academic Editor: Rodrigo Franco

Copyright © 2018 Su Yeon Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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