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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 3617508, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3617508
Review Article

Autophagy Is a Promoter for Aerobic Exercise Performance during High Altitude Training

1Graduate School, Wuhan Sports University, Wuhan 430079, China
2College of Sports, Hubei University of Science and Technology, Xianning 437100, China
3Tianjiu Research and Development Center for Exercise Nutrition and Foods, Hubei Key Laboratory of Sport Training and Monitoring, College of Health Science, Wuhan Sports University, Wuhan 430079, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Ning Chen; moc.liamg@015nehcn

Received 18 January 2018; Revised 10 March 2018; Accepted 15 March 2018; Published 5 April 2018

Academic Editor: Silvana Hrelia

Copyright © 2018 Ying Zhang and Ning Chen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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