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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2019, Article ID 3085756, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/3085756
Review Article

Oxidative Stress and Advanced Lipoxidation and Glycation End Products (ALEs and AGEs) in Aging and Age-Related Diseases

1I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), 8 Trubetskaya Street, Moscow, 119991, Russia
2N.I. Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, 1 Ostrovityanov Street, Moscow, 117997, Russia
3Saint Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, 49 Kronverksky Prospect, St. Petersburg, 197101, Russia

Correspondence should be addressed to Nurbubu T. Moldogazieva; ur.liam@aveizagodlomn

Received 18 January 2019; Accepted 27 June 2019; Published 14 August 2019

Academic Editor: Demetrios Kouretas

Copyright © 2019 Nurbubu T. Moldogazieva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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