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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2019, Article ID 4628962, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/4628962
Research Article

Glycine Suppresses AGE/RAGE Signaling Pathway and Subsequent Oxidative Stress by Restoring Glo1 Function in the Aorta of Diabetic Rats and in HUVECs

Department of Endocrinology, Peking University First Hospital, No. 8 Xishiku Avenue, Xicheng District, Beijing 100034, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Junqing Zhang; moc.hfukp@gnahz.gniqnuj

Received 25 September 2018; Accepted 13 January 2019; Published 3 March 2019

Guest Editor: Fiona L. Wilkinson

Copyright © 2019 Ziwei Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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