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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 487450, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/487450
Review Article

The Endotoxin-Induced Neuroinflammation Model of Parkinson's Disease

Department of Neuroscience, Health Science Institute, Dokuz Eylul University, Inciralti, 35340 Izmir, Turkey

Received 14 September 2010; Revised 18 November 2010; Accepted 16 December 2010

Academic Editor: Enrico Schmidt

Copyright © 2011 Kemal Ugur Tufekci et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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