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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 658083, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/658083
Review Article

Limitations of Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease

Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064-3037, USA

Received 10 August 2010; Revised 24 September 2010; Accepted 18 October 2010

Academic Editor: Enrico Schmidt

Copyright © 2011 J. A. Potashkin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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