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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 713517, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/713517
Review Article

Inflammatory Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in Toxin-Based Models of Parkinson's Disease

Institute of Neuroscience, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1S 5B6

Received 15 October 2010; Accepted 9 December 2010

Academic Editor: Stéphane Hunot

Copyright © 2011 Darcy Litteljohn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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