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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2012, Article ID 918719, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/918719
Review Article

A Review of Dual-Task Walking Deficits in People with Parkinson's Disease: Motor and Cognitive Contributions, Mechanisms, and Clinical Implications

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, P.O. Box 356490, Seattle, WA 98195-6490, USA

Received 1 June 2011; Revised 29 August 2011; Accepted 4 September 2011

Academic Editor: Alice Nieuwboer

Copyright © 2012 Valerie E. Kelly et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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