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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2014, Article ID 472157, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/472157
Research Article

Nonmotor Symptoms in a Malaysian Parkinson’s Disease Population

1Department of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Jalan Yaacob Latif, Cheras, 56000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2Department of Pathology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Jalan Yaacob Latif, Cheras, 56000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
3Department of Public Health, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Jalan Yaacob Latif, Cheras, 56000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 29 December 2013; Revised 4 March 2014; Accepted 5 March 2014; Published 1 April 2014

Academic Editor: Peter Hagell

Copyright © 2014 Shahrul Azmin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The nonmotor symptoms are important determinants of health and quality of life in Parkinson’s disease but are not well recognized and addressed in clinical practice. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of nonmotor symptoms and their impact on quality of life in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study among patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease. Exclusion criteria were a Mini Mental State Examination score of <21/30. Prevalence of nonmotor symptoms was determined using the NMSQuest. The severity of nonmotor symptoms and the quality of life were assessed using validated disease-specific questionnaires (PDQ-39 and NMSS). Results. A total of 113 patients consisting of 60 males and 53 females were recruited. The median duration of illness was 5.0 (2.0–8.0) years. The prevalence rate of nonmotor symptoms in our cohort was 97.3%. The most common reported nonmotor symptom in our cohort was gastrointestinal (76.1%). We found that the severity of the nonmotor symptoms was associated with poorer quality of life scores ( : 0.727, ). Conclusions. Nonmotor symptoms were highly prevalent in our patients with Parkinson’s disease and adversely affected the quality of life of our patients. In contrast to western studies, the most common nonmotor symptom is gastrointestinal. The possibility of an Asian diet playing a role in this observation requires further study.