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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2015, Article ID 303294, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/303294
Review Article

Targeting Histone Deacetylases: A Novel Approach in Parkinson’s Disease

Neuropharmacology Division, Department of Pharmacy, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, Rajasthan 333031, India

Received 30 September 2014; Accepted 3 January 2015

Academic Editor: Hélio Teive

Copyright © 2015 Sorabh Sharma and Rajeev Taliyan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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