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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 381281, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/381281
Review Article

Neurophysiology of Drosophila Models of Parkinson’s Disease

1Department of Biology, University of York, York YO1 5DD, UK
2The MRC Protein Phosphorylation and Ubiquitylation Unit, The Sir James Black Centre, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dow Street, Dundee DD1 5EH, UK

Received 18 December 2014; Accepted 16 March 2015

Academic Editor: Elisa Greggio

Copyright © 2015 Ryan J. H. West et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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