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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2016, Article ID 3508073, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3508073
Research Article

Drosophila Mutant Model of Parkinson’s Disease Revealed an Unexpected Olfactory Performance: Morphofunctional Evidences

1Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy
2Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy
3Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Section of Plant Protection, University of Florence, Firenze, Italy
4Pinnacle Biomedical Research Institute, Bhopal, India
5Department of Public Health, Clinical and Molecular Medicine, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy

Received 25 May 2016; Revised 2 August 2016; Accepted 4 August 2016

Academic Editor: Jan Aasly

Copyright © 2016 Francescaelena De Rose et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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