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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2016, Article ID 7049108, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7049108
Review Article

Parkinson’s Disease: The Mitochondria-Iron Link

Iron and Biology of Aging Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile

Received 21 January 2016; Revised 12 April 2016; Accepted 13 April 2016

Academic Editor: Rubén Gómez-Sánchez

Copyright © 2016 Yorka Muñoz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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