Table of Contents
Physiology Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 106049, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/106049
Research Article

Cardiovascular and Thermal Response to Dry-Sauna Exposure in Healthy Subjects

1Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health Sciences Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, M. Sklodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz, Poland
2Department of Health Care Politics and Social Care, Faculty of Health Sciences Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Sandomierska 16, 85-094 Bydgoszcz, Poland
3Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Medicine Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Karłowicza 24, 85-092 Bydgoszcz, Poland
4Institute for Ageing and Health, The Medical School, Newcastle University, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH, UK

Received 4 August 2014; Accepted 23 September 2014; Published 8 October 2014

Academic Editor: Marco Guazzi

Copyright © 2014 Pawel Zalewski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Dry-sauna is a strong thermal stimulus and is commonly used all over the world. The aim of this experiment was to comprehensively analyse cardiovascular and autonomic changes that result from an increase in core body temperature during sauna bath. The study included 9 healthy men with mean age 26.7 ± 3.0 years and comparable anthropomorphical characteristics. Each subject was exposed to one 15-minute session of dry-sauna treatment at 100°C and 30–40% humidity. The autonomic and baseline cardiovascular (i.e., hemodynamic and contractility) parameters were measured noninvasively with Task Force Monitor. Cardiovascular autonomic functions were assessed using baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) and spectral analysis of heart rate (HRV) and blood pressure (BPV) variability. Measurements were performed four times, at the following stages “before sauna,” “after sauna,” “sauna + 3 h,” and “sauna + 6 h.” The first recording constituted a baseline for the subsequent three measurements. The changes in core body temperature were determined with the Vital Sense telemetric measurement system. Results show that exposure to the extreme external environmental conditions of dry-sauna does not compromise homeostasis in healthy persons. The hemodynamic changes induced by heating are efficiently compensated by the cardiovascular system and do not exert negative effects upon its short-term regulatory potential.