Table of Contents
Physiology Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 763879, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/763879
Review Article

The Altered Water System: Excess Levels of Free Radicals Contribute to Carcinogenesis by Altering Arginine Vasopressin Production and Secretion and Promoting Dysregulated Water Homeostasis in Concert with Other Factors

North Dakota State University (NDSU), c/o, Department 2620, P.O. Box 6050, Fargo, ND 58102-6050, USA

Received 13 September 2014; Revised 13 November 2014; Accepted 14 November 2014; Published 26 November 2014

Academic Editor: Chih-Hsin Tang

Copyright © 2014 Amy Marie Beutler and Bradford N. Strand. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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