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Pulmonary Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 542402, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/542402
Research Article

Determination of Best Criteria to Determine Final and Initial Speeds within Ramp Exercise Testing Protocols

1Department of Sports Science, Brazilian Olympic Committee, Avenida das Américas 899, 22631-000 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Laboratory of Physical Activity and Health Promotion, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Sala 8121F, 20550-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
3Graduate Program in Sciences of Physical Activity, Salgado de Oliveira University, Rua Marechal Deodoro 217, No. 2 Andar, 24030-060 Niteroi, RJ, Brazil
4Graduate Program in Medical Sciences, Rio de Janeiro State University, Avenida Professor Manoel de Abreu, 444/No. 2 Andar, Vila Isabel, 20550-170 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
5Cardiology Division, Palo Alto VA Health Care System, Cardiology 111C, 3801 Miranda Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA

Received 20 May 2012; Revised 25 September 2012; Accepted 25 September 2012

Academic Editor: Darcy D. Marciniuk

Copyright © 2012 Sidney C. da Silva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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