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Pulmonary Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 105864, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/105864
Research Article

Trends in Pulmonary Hypertension Mortality and Morbidity

Department of Medicine, Howard University, 2041 Georgia Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20060, USA

Received 18 March 2014; Accepted 14 May 2014; Published 1 June 2014

Academic Editor: Luisetti Maurizio

Copyright © 2014 Alem Mehari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Context. Few reports have been published regarding surveillance data for pulmonary hypertension, a debilitating and often fatal condition. Aims. We report trends in pulmonary hypertension. Settings and Design. United States of America; vital statistics, hospital data. Methods and Material. We used mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) for 1999–2008 and hospital discharge data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) for 1999–2009. Statistical Analysis Used. We present age-standardized rates. Results. Since 1999, the numbers of deaths and hospitalizations as well as death rates and hospitalization rates for pulmonary hypertension have increased. In 1999 death rates were higher for men than for women; however, by 2002, no differences by gender remained because of the increasing death rates among women and the declining death rates among men; after 2003 death rates for women were higher than for men. Death rates throughout the reporting period 1999–2008 were higher for blacks than for whites. Hospitalization rates in women were 1.3–1.6 times higher than in men. Conclusions. Pulmonary hypertension mortality and hospitalization numbers and rates increased from 1999 to 2008.