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PPAR Research
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 39654, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/39654
Review Article

The Functions of PPARs in Aging and Longevity

Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Celal Bayar University, Manisa 45020, Turkey

Received 5 June 2007; Revised 23 July 2007; Accepted 14 September 2007

Academic Editor: J. Christopher Corton

Copyright © 2007 Adnan Erol. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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