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PPAR Research
Volume 2007, Article ID 49109, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/49109
Review Article

The Genetic Basis of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Literature Review Including Discussion of PPAR-γ

1Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Hacettepe, Ankara 06100, Turkey
2Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Hacettepe, Ankara 06100, Turkey
3Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Hacettepe, Ankara 06100, Turkey

Received 19 July 2006; Revised 24 November 2006; Accepted 3 December 2006

Academic Editor: Carolyn M. Komar

Copyright © 2007 Ugur Unluturk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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