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PPAR Research
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 87934, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/87934
Review Article

Roles of Retinoids and Retinoic Acid Receptors in the Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Differentiation

Center for Regenerative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Boston, MA 02114, USA

Received 9 April 2007; Accepted 22 May 2007

Academic Editor: Z. Elizabeth Floyd

Copyright © 2007 Louise E. Purton. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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