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PPAR Research
Volume 2008, Article ID 785405, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/785405
Review Article

PPAR Inhibitors as Novel Tubulin-Targeting Agents

Gastroenterology and Hepatology Division, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA

Received 29 February 2008; Accepted 1 May 2008

Academic Editor: Dipak Panigrahy

Copyright © 2008 Katherine L. Schaefer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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