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PPAR Research
Volume 2010, Article ID 794739, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/794739
Research Article

Gene Expression Profiling in Wild-Type and PPAR 𝛼 -Null Mice Exposed to Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Reveals PPAR 𝛼 -Independent Effects

1Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD 72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA
2Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Team, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD 72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA
3Analytical Chemistry Team, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD 72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA
4Toxicology Assessment Division, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD 72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA

Received 27 April 2010; Accepted 13 July 2010

Academic Editor: Michael Cunningham

Copyright © 2010 Mitchell B. Rosen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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