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Pathology Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 123491, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/123491
Review Article

Human Polyomaviruses in Skin Diseases

1Institute of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway
2Department of Medical Genetics, University Hospital of Northern-Norway, 9038 Tromsø, Norway

Received 28 February 2011; Accepted 29 June 2011

Academic Editor: Gerardo Ferrara

Copyright © 2011 Ugo Moens et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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