Pain Research and Management

Pain Research and Management / 2015 / Article

Original Article | Open Access

Volume 20 |Article ID 763768 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/763768

Elizabeth G VanDenKerkhof, Linda VanTil, James M Thompson, Jill Sweet, Wilma M Hopman, Meg E Carley, Kerry Sudom, "Pain in Canadian Veterans: Analysis of Data from the Survey on Transition to Civilian Life", Pain Research and Management, vol. 20, Article ID 763768, 7 pages, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/763768

Pain in Canadian Veterans: Analysis of Data from the Survey on Transition to Civilian Life

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the prevalence of chronic pain among Veterans outside the United States.OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of chronic pain and associated sociodemographic, health behaviour, employment/income, disability, and physical and mental health factors in Canadian Veterans.METHODS: The 2010 Survey on Transition to Civilian Life included a nationally representative sample of 3154 Canadian Armed Forces Regular Force Veterans released from service between 1998 and 2007. Data from a telephone survey of Veterans were linked with Department of National Defence and Veterans Affairs Canada administrative databases. Pain was defined as constant/reoccurring pain (chronic pain) and as moderate/severe pain interference with activities.RESULTS: Forty-one percent of the population experienced constant chronic pain and 23% experienced intermittent chronic pain. Twenty-five percent reported pain interference. Needing help with tasks of daily living, back problems, arthritis, gastrointestinal conditions and age ≥30 years were independently associated with chronic pain. Needing help with tasks of daily living, back problems, arthritis, mental health conditions, age ≥30 years, gastrointestinal conditions, low social support and noncommissioned member rank were associated with pain interference.CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide evidence for agencies and those supporting the well-being of Veterans, and inform longitudinal studies to better understand the determinants and life course effects of chronic pain in military Veterans.

Copyright © 2015 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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