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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2016, Article ID 1931590, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1931590
Research Article

Gender Differences in Pain-Physical Activity Linkages among Older Adults: Lessons Learned from Daily Life Approaches

1Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
2Center for Hip Health and Mobility, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
3Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Received 29 June 2015; Accepted 2 December 2015

Copyright © 2016 Amy Ho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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