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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2016, Article ID 9570581, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9570581
Research Article

Change Narratives That Elude Quantification: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of How People with Chronic Pain Perceive Pain Rehabilitation

1School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
2Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada
3Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Received 17 May 2016; Accepted 27 October 2016

Academic Editor: Till Sprenger

Copyright © 2016 Timothy H. Wideman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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