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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7892494, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7892494
Research Article

Effects of a Pain Catastrophizing Induction on Sensory Testing in Women with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Pilot Study

Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1070 Arastradero, Suite 200, MC 5596, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1336, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Chloe J. Taub; ude.imaim@78tjc

Received 2 December 2016; Accepted 1 February 2017; Published 28 February 2017

Academic Editor: Fletcher A. White

Copyright © 2017 Chloe J. Taub et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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