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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2018, Article ID 8459429, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8459429
Clinical Study

The Influence of Expectation on Nondeceptive Placebo and Nocebo Effects

Hua Wei,1,2,3 Lili Zhou,1,2 Huijuan Zhang,1,2,3 Jie Chen,4 Xuejing Lu,1,2 and Li Hu1,2,3,4

1CAS Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Beijing, China
2Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
3Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China
4Cognition and Human Behavior Key Laboratory of Hunan Province, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Jie Chen; moc.361@nehcxlx and Xuejing Lu; nc.ca.hcysp@jxul

Hua Wei and Lili Zhou contributed equally to this work.

Received 30 November 2017; Accepted 30 January 2018; Published 19 March 2018

Academic Editor: Filippo Brighina

Copyright © 2018 Hua Wei et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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