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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2018, Article ID 8564215, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8564215
Review Article

Chronic Pain in Inflammatory Arthritis: Mechanisms, Metrology, and Emerging Targets—A Focus on the JAK-STAT Pathway

1Rheumatology Department, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy
2Medical Department, Pfizer, Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Marco Di Carlo; ti.oohay@ocram.acid

Received 7 September 2017; Accepted 13 December 2017; Published 7 February 2018

Academic Editor: Jacob Ablin

Copyright © 2018 Fausto Salaffi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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